Camera 101: Rule of Thirds

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You just received a new camera for the holidays. Now it is time to take some great dramatic shots over the next year. One thing you can do to make your images more aesthetic is to use the Rule of Thirds.

The Rule of Thirds is not necessarily a rule, as much as it is a suggestion that tends to add more tension, energy, and interest into your photo. It works like this: when you look through your viewfinder, divide the image into thirds, both horizontally and vertically.

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We call the points where the lines cross The Sweet Spots. When we look at a big blank area, our eyes do not automatically focus on the very center of the image. Instead, our eyes naturally drift toward one of these points.

So how can you use this bit of knowledge to create beautiful images?

When you shoot a landscape, try placing the horizon along the upper or lower third of the image.

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The subject (Castle Rock, KS) is centered in the middle of the shot, which is rather boring.

Place the primary subject or area of interest on the left or right vertical line, with the main interest on the sweet spot.

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In this shot, the subject has been moved to the left side with the horizon line placed near the lower third.

Eyes work best in the upper third of the shot.

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By leaving too much “headroom” above the subject you cut off the interesting parts of the image.

Don ?t center your subject in the shot. Examine the two images. Which one is more dynamic? The image on the bottom has the subject place near the right sweet spot.

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A subject-centered shot can be boring…

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…by composing the shot with the subjects along the sweet spots, the image becomes more dynamic. When you compare the images, does the man look more happy in the lower shot?

Finally, it doesn ?t matter what aspect ratio you use, the Rule of Thirds still applies. In the following image, notice the horizon is on the lower third, while the portion of the canyon wall closest to the camera is along the right third.

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Remember, in photography or videography, rules are not necessarily set in stone, some very interesting shots can be achieved when you break the rules.

2 Replies to “Camera 101: Rule of Thirds”

  1. Funny thing is that even your centered shots are interesting but thanx a lot for the 1/3s tip. I’d either forgotten or never heard of them. Been 2 years since I’ve had a chance to shoot. Broken VX, no $$$. But I’m HD crazy now, HV20 bought, A1 & HVX on order.

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